The LogosWord Website
In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth  
Home page Bible software Online shopping Webstore Archive Booklists
LogosWord | LogosLite | Amazon Webstore | LogosComment | Resources | Software | Links | About | Donate | Contact
John: Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)
~Andreas J. Kostenberger
Click to enlarge...
List price: $44.99
Our price: $29.69
Usually ships in 24 hours
Average customer rating: 5.0 out of 5
1 star1 star1 star1 star1 star
Sales rank: 222614

Product Information

Media: Hardcover
ISBN/ASIN : 080102644X
Manufacturer : Baker Academic
Release data : December, 2004

Search for related products

  • Bible
  • Bible - Commentaries - New Testament
  • Bible.
  • Commentaries
  • John
  • N.T
  • N.T.
  • Religion
  • Religion - Commentaries / Reference
  • Theology

  • A selection of product reviews


    1 star1 star1 star1 star1 star    Outstanding Commentary

    Andreas Kostenberger has provided us with a genuine treat in his new commentary on the Gospel of John. This commentary is in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series, which is developing into one of the most useful series of commentaries for those who love God's word.

    Like all of the commentaries in this series, Kostenberger's volumn is written from an evangelical standpoint that embraces the Gospel of John as being the authoritative word of God. This work consistently interacts with the Greek text and the majority of major contemporary commentaries on John.

    Highlights of this volumn include:

    1. It is extremely well written. Even in a series known for its readabilty, Kostenberger stands out as a model of clarity. Rather than simply checking selections, I have read this commentary from cover to cover - and it is a great joy to read.
    2. Kostenberger makes outstanding use of footnotes. This feature makes it particularly easy to find both the support for his interpretations as well as dissenting voices. I suspect this feature alone will make Kostenberger's commentary the first one to be pulled off of the shelf.
    3. Unlike many commentaries that answer all the questions except the one you are actually asking; this volumn shows exceptional judgment in selecting and addressing questions. Preachers will find this commentary a particulary rich and helpful resource in sermon preparation.

    Are there reservations in recommending this commentary? Yes. First, while anyone could benefit from Kostenberger's excellent work - it will be best used by those who have at least one year of Koine Greek. Second, I wish that Kostenberger had been a little more painstaking in making and commenting on his (generally excellent) translation. Two illustrations of this should suffice:

    1. Kostenberger translates John 3:19 "This is the verdict: light has come into the world, but people preferred darkness to light; for their deeds were evil." The words translated "preferred" are almost universally translated "loved" and "more than" (i.e. "loved darkness more than light"). The word "loved" is identical to the word "loved" in John 3:16 just 3 verses earlier ("God so loved the world"). It is difficult to see why Kostenberger would lessen the force of this statement from "loved darkness" to "preferred darkness" and he offers no explanation in his text.
    2. Kostenberger translates John 3:9 "Nicodemus answered and said to him, 'how can these things happen?'" The commentary points out that nearly all translations of this verse (NIV, NASB, NRSV, NKJV, NLT, ESV, TNIV, et. al.) render this verse "How can these things be?" Kostenberger then writes: "However, the translation 'How can these things happen?' is preferrable" without offering any explanation at all as to why it is preferrable or what difference it makes. Perhaps he thinks it is simply obvious, but the fact that it wasn't obvious to any of the translation committees of all the major English translations of the Bible cries out for an explanation/argument.

    These are obviously very minor criticisms. This is a wonderful commentary and belongs on the shelf of every student of John's Gospel.



    1 star1 star1 star1 star1 star    Author's Response

    I appreciate David's positive review. The purpose of this brief note is to respond to the second of his two criticisms, which is that I do not justify my translation of 3:9 as "How can these things happen?" rather than the more conventional rendering, "How can these things be?"

    In short, David's criticism is not valid. It is true that I do not include an explicit rationale. I do, however, refer the reader to the commentaries by Barrett and Carson, implying that I concur with their rationale. All the reader has to do, therefore, is to go to one of these commentaries to find out why I favor this particular rendering.

    I realize that sending the reader to another commentary is not ideal, but at times it was necessary to use this kind of shorthand in light of space constraints. In any case, the reader who wants to know why I chose this particular rendering can find out why by consulting Barrett and/or Carson. I hope this helps.



    1 star1 star1 star1 star1 star    Outstanding New Commentary

    Andreas Kostenberger has provided us with a genuine treat in his new commentary on the Gospel of John. This commentary is in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series, which is developing into one of the most useful series of commentaries for those who love God's word.

    Like all of the commentaries in this series, Kostenberger's volumn is written from an evangelical standpoint that embraces the Gospel of John as being the authoritative word of God. This work consistently interacts with the Greek text and the majority of major contemporary commentaries on John.

    Highlights of this volumn include:

    1. It is extremely well written. Even in a series known for its readabilty, Kostenberger stands out as a model of clarity. Rather than simply checking selections, I have read this commentary from cover to cover - and it is a great joy to read.
    2. Kostenberger makes outstanding use of footnotes. This feature makes it particularly easy to find both the support for his interpretations as well as dissenting voices. I suspect this feature alone will make Kostenberger's commentary the first one to be pulled off of the shelf.
    3. Unlike many commentaries that answer all the questions except the one you are actually asking; this volumn shows exceptional judgment in selecting and addressing questions. Preachers will find this commentary a particulary rich and helpful resource in sermon preparation.

    Are there reservations in recommending this commentary? Yes. First, while anyone could benefit from Kostenberger's excellent work - it will be best used by those who have at least one year of Koine Greek. Second, I wish that Kostenberger had been a little more painstaking in making and commenting on his (generally excellent) translation. Two illustrations of this should suffice:

    1. Kostenberger translates John 3:19 "This is the verdict: light has come into the world, but people preferred darkness to light; for their deeds were evil." The words translated "preferred" are almost universally translated "loved" and "more than" (i.e. "loved darkness more than light"). The word "loved" is identical to the word "loved" in John 3:16 just 3 verses earlier ("God so loved the world"). It is difficult to see why Kostenberger would lessen the force of this statement from "loved darkness" to "preferred darkness" and he offers no explanation in his text.
    2. Kostenberger translates John 3:9 "Nicodemus answered and said to him, 'how can these things happen?'" The commentary points out that nearly all translations of this verse (NIV, NASB, NRSV, NKJV, NLT, ESV, TNIV, et. al.) render this verse "How can these things be?" Kostenberger then writes: "However, the translation 'How can these things happen?' is preferrable" without offering any explanation at all as to why it is preferrable or what difference it makes. Perhaps he thinks it is simply obvious, but the fact that it wasn't obvious to any of the translation committees of all the major English translations of the Bible cries out for an explanation/argument.

    These are obviously very minor criticisms. This is a wonderful commentary and belongs on the shelf of every student of John's Gospel.


    Product Options



    Secure online payment

    Add directly to Amazon basket
    Let someone else know about this product!

    Read some Amazon reviews about this product.

    Search in other countries


    Other Recommended products

    Check the box on any product below that you'd like to include in your basket when you hit the 'Add to basket' button.

    Philippians (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)
    Add to basket
    Usually ships in 1 to 2 days
    1 Corinthians (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)
    Add to basket
    Usually ships in 24 hours
    Revelation (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)
    Add to basket
    Usually ships in 24 hours
    The Gospel of John: A Commentary (2 Volume Set)
    Add to basket
    Usually ships in 24 hours
    1 Peter (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)
    Add to basket
    Usually ships in 1 to 2 days
    US Home |  UK Home |  Help |  About Us |  Admin Options |  Contact Us |  ©2004 The LogosWord Website | Amazon Webstore Version 04050100